Sonntag, Dezember 12, 2004

Die "Lautaro"...

ist ein Schiff der chilenischen Armee, das zur Versorgung der chilenischen Antarktisstationen im Einsatz ist. Die Webcam hat am 6. Dez. einige Bilder der "Lautaro" aufgenommen.
Bildserie von der Ankunft bis zur Abfahrt:










Bild: Abreise einiger Mitarbeiter von O'Higgins, die "Lautaro" verschwindet wieder im Nebel der Nordantarktis...


Auf der offiziellen Infoseite der Forschungsstation (Quelle: http://vlbi.leipzig.ifag.de/ohiggins/news.htm) heißt es dazu am 6.12.2004: Die "Lautaro" ist wieder vor OHiggins, diesmal wegen dem Eis in der Bucht in etwas größerer Entfernung

* Die Anlandung mit zwei Zodiaks (Schlauchboote)
* Abreise der alten chilenischen Dotation 2004 (Dotation=Überwinterer, die neue "Dotation " bleibt in der chilenischen Basis bis Anfang Dezember 2005)
* Abreise Willi Wende und Eduardo Deschamps (ESAT)
* Abreise Christian Plötz (TU München) und Cristobal Javier Jara Rodríguez (TIGO Concepcion)


Schiffsbeschreibung der chil. Armee: http://www.armada.cl/site/unidades_navales/523.htm

Kommentare:

Dot K hat gesagt…

Hello Martin - With this giant iceberg have any impact on the Gentoo Penguins? Here is the text of the article I just received from CNN News Alerts. I hope the Gentoo penguins will be okay.

Iceberg threat to penguin chicks

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- Tens of thousands of Antarctic penguin chicks could starve to death in the next few weeks as a huge iceberg blocks access to coastal feeding grounds, a New Zealand official has said.

A 3,000 square-kilometer (1,200 square-mile) iceberg, known as B15A, could also block the sea route used to supply three science stations during the Southern Hemisphere summer, said Lou Sanson, chief executive of the government scientific agency Antarctica New Zealand.

The iceberg has blocked sea ice flows from McMurdo Sound as it moves at a speed of 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) a day. U.S. researchers have estimated that B15A contains enough fresh water to supply Egypt's Nile River complex for 80 years, Sanson said.

He called the iceberg "the largest floating thing on the planet right now," and said it could block four supply ships due to arrive in Antarctica in a month.

Three thousand breeding pairs of Adele penguins on Antarctic's Cape Royds face a 180-kilometer (112-mile) round trip to bring food to their chicks, because their access to ocean feeding grounds has been cut by the ice buildup.

"So by the time a penguin comes in from the ice edge on a return 180-kilometer (112-mile) walk they've used all the food" they gathered when they reach their nests, he said.

"Penguin researchers are predicting that the annual hatching is pretty certain to fail," Sanson said, meaning most chicks will die.

Scientists also fear that only about 10 percent of the 50,000 breeding pairs of Adele penguins at nearby Cape Bird will rear a chick this season, Sanson added.

Adult penguins there face a 100-kilometer (60-mile) round trip across the ice to reach open water and food.

Antarctica New Zealand is working with the United States and Italian Antarctic programs on alternatives for receiving vital fuel supplies for their science bases in late January.

A U.S. icebreaker, fuel tanker and cargo ship plus an Italian cargo vessel are due to deliver a year's supply of fuel and food at that time, he said.

The alternatives are to break a 130-kilometer (81-mile) channel through the pack ice to reach Winter Quarters Bay on the McMurdo Sound coast -- or offload the fuel and other supplies on the ice edge, pumping fuel through temporary lines several miles to storage tanks, he said.

All Antarctic bases have contingency supplies of a year's food and fuel, Sanson said.

Currently there is "more fast (blocked) ice in McMurdo Sound than we've ever recorded in living history for this time of year," Sanson said, adding that the iceberg has been stopping normal winds and water currents from breaking up sea ice in McMurdo Sound.

Anonym hat gesagt…

Hello DotK,

thank you for this very intersting article! As far as I know this is an rather "old" problem with these huge icebergs in the Ross Sea called B15A and C19. The scales of these "monsters" are those of several hundred kilometers long so they block parts of the continent. B15A evolved in 2000:

http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/research/biodiversity/penguins/b15a.asp

Since this time he seemed to cause many problems for some large penguin colonies in this area of the continent. I don't know the exact date of your "News" but I definetly read an almost similar headline one year ago! So is it from Dezember 2004 what you posted - could you please check it? Here an other link about the impact of these "monster-icebergs":

http://www.polar.org/antsun/oldissues2001-2002/2002_0106/penguin.html
http://www.polar.org/antsun/oldissues2002-2003/Sun102702/icebergsside.html


Our icebergs in front of the camera are just like very little toys in comparison with the monsters C19 and B15A - they won't have any impact on the nesting Gentoos there! The westside of the antarcitc peninsula is by far the most ice-free region of all of the Antarctic and has nothing to do with the huge Ross and Larsen Ice Shelf areas which are much closer to the continent itselve.